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#qskills – Why are the four skills normally divided into listening & speaking and reading & writing?

13 Comments

Today’s question for the Q: Skills for Success authors: Why are the four skills normally divided into listening & speaking and reading & writing?

Ann Snow responds.

We are no longer taking questions. Thank you to everyone who contacted us!

Look out for more responses by the Q authors in the coming weeks, or check out the answers that we’ve posted already in our Questions for Q authors playlist.

Author: Oxford University Press ELT

The official global blog for Oxford University Press English Language Teaching. Bringing teachers and other ELT professionals top quality resources, tools, hints and tips, news, ideas, insights and discussions to help further their ELT career. Follow Oxford ELT on Twitter. Find Oxford ELT on Google+.

13 thoughts on “#qskills – Why are the four skills normally divided into listening & speaking and reading & writing?

  1. Pingback: #qskills – When should L1 be used in class? | Oxford University Press

  2. The information in the video was interesting and there are valid points. However, I feel that we must ensure FIRST that the learner (no matter what the level is) understands and can manage their L1 first before navigating within L2. In particular, when dealing with blending subject material or integrating language from a topic (mathematics, for example).
    As a teacher here in Mexico, the situation is that L1 is considered to being “taught too fast…” thereby, when presenting the material in L2, the learner is confused because their knowledge of content is weak in their native tongue.
    It can be a sticky widget, but supporting L1 in content, in my opinion is a necessary evil at times.

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