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World Environment Day: Going paper-free in your EFL Classroom

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This Friday, June 5th, marks UN World Environment Day, a day recognised to encourage worldwide awareness and action for the environment. With the theme this year being: ‘Seven Billion Dreams. One planet. Consume with care’, it’s worth looking at our every day practices, particularly in the classroom, and asking where we can conserve and reduce our consumption of resources. With the online resource of our Oxford Teacher’s Club and thousands of digital materials ready for download, we thought this week would be a great time to put together a collection of articles supporting paper-free and digital English language teaching. 

Teaching a lesson with e-books

Teaching with Web 2.0 Tools (Part 1)

Teaching with Web 2.0 Tools (Part 2)

Teaching with Web 2.0 Tools (Part 3)

Flipping and Creating Video Presentations

Getting English language students to practise out of class

How do you use OUP digital resources in your class?

Using Social Media and Smart Devices effectively in your classroom

#EFLproblems – Facing your technology fears

The value of Virtual Learning Environments for Business English

Edmodo: Introducing the virtual classroom

5 Apps Every Teacher Should Have

So you want to teach online?

White paper on Tablets and Apps in School

Adapting online materials to suit your students

Using blogs to create web-based English courses

Author: Oxford University Press ELT

The official global blog for Oxford University Press English Language Teaching. Bringing teachers and other ELT professionals top quality resources, tools, hints and tips, news, ideas, insights and discussions to help further their ELT career. Follow Oxford ELT on Twitter. Find Oxford ELT on Google+.

One thought on “World Environment Day: Going paper-free in your EFL Classroom

  1. Before you go throwing out your stationery, it’s worth reading this research paper here on the effects of using laptops in classrooms.

    Abstract

    Taking notes on laptops rather than in longhand is increasingly common. Many researchers have suggested that laptop note taking is less effective than longhand note taking for learning. Prior studies have primarily focused on students’ capacity for multitasking and distraction when using laptops. The present research suggests that even when laptops are used solely to take notes, they may still be impairing learning because their use results in shallower processing. In three studies, we found that students who took notes on laptops performed worse on conceptual questions than students who took notes longhand. We show that whereas taking more notes can be beneficial, laptop note takers’ tendency to transcribe lectures verbatim rather than processing information and reframing it in their own words is detrimental to learning.

    Mueller, P. A., & Oppenheimer, D. M. (2014). The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking. Psychological Science, 0956797614524581. http://doi.org/10.1177/0956797614524581

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