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How can I motivate unmotivated students?

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IGS-00181940-001Ken Wilson is the author of Smart Choice and in all has written more than 30 ELT titles. We asked teachers from around the world who have been using Smart Choice what one question they would like to ask Ken. He will answer three of these questions in a series of video blogs this month.

For both teachers and students, a very large class can be difficult in terms of motivation and in terms of multi-level instruction. In this video blog Ken will answer two questions to overcome these challenges: “How can I motivate unmotivated students?” and “how can we adapt Smart Choice for different class sizes and classes with students of varying levels?”

Ken suggests techniques to increase student curiosity in class in order to engage learners with simple tasks, such as reading a text. He explains how teachers can devolve student responsibility to empower higher-level students to help other students.

 

 

References:

Wilson, Ken (2012). Motivating the unmotivated.

Oxford University Press (2016). Smart Choice Third Edition.

Author: Oxford University Press ELT

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7 thoughts on “How can I motivate unmotivated students?

  1. I’m in the field of ELT for the last 37 years and I do believe what you said in the video is very right. You are really great and very fascinating
    It’ll be helpful to the teachers if they keep in mind what you said it works like anything
    Now I realise I practised some of the things in the class and they are effective

  2. Reblogged this on Teachers thoughts, quotes and dreams and commented:
    “Learning and teaching should not stand on opposite banks and just watch the river flow by; instead, they should embark together on a journey down the water. Through an active, reciprocal exchange, teaching can strengthen learning how to learn.”
    Loris Malaguzzi

    “What a teacher is, is more important than what he teaches”
    Karl Menninger

    “Good teaching is 1/4 preparation and 3/4 theatre.”
    Gail Godwin

    “Learning without thinking is labor lost; thinking without learning is dangerous.”
    – Chinese proverb.

  3. Reblogged this on Halina's Thoughts and commented:
    “Learning without thinking is labor lost; thinking without learning is dangerous.”
    – Chinese proverb.

  4. Hello,I’m Nadia .Thanks for your tips , they will help me in teaching larg and mixability students.

  5. thank you so much for sharing

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