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EFL activities for Bonfire (Guy Fawkes) Night

Bonfire night

 


Remember, remember the fifth of November

Gunpowder, treason and plot.

I see no reason why gunpowder treason

Should ever be forgot.

 

 

 

Guy Fawkes Night (Bonfire Night) – November 5th is an interesting date in the British celebratory calendar, where sparklers, bonfires and fireworks are all lit in the name of Guy Fawkes. But what’s the real story behind this British cultural event?

Interestingly November 5th has always been a date for celebration, long before the events that unfolded in 1605. But since Guy Fawkes and his accomplices failed to blow-up the houses of parliament, the date is used to mark their failure. It might seem an odd occasion to celebrate, but for 250 years it was the law to remember the failed plot!

The politics of the time are somewhat forgotten in present day events; now Guy Fawkes Night/Bonfire Night is really just a great excuse for a party! But still, the story behind it is well known in Britain, so it’s a great opportunity to get your students accustomed to some British culture as they learn English.

To help you, we have put together a variety of activities that can be used at various levels and with different age groups, including:

  • Warm-up rhymes
  • Secret mission cards
  • Role play activities
  • Reading and speaking activities
  • Certificates

It’s all available on the *Oxford Teacher’s Club! Click the button below to download your own Guy Fawkes teacher activity pack, and spark some fantastic English dialogue with your class.


*Not a member of the Oxford Teacher’s Club? It’s free, and it only takes minutes to register! Join now and enjoy access to thousands of teaching ideas and activities for all ages.


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Perspectives on Lesson Planning

lessonplanELT teacher, teacher trainer and course book author, John Hughes, looks at different approaches to lesson planning and their effectiveness as teaching tools ahead of his webinar on the subject on the 19th and 22nd of January.

Here’s a photograph of a colleague’s lesson plan. It’s written on a piece of note paper taken from a hotel room and was used with a class of students at a business college. In many ways it breaks the rules of what we might call ‘lesson planning’. After all, where are the aims, the timings, the class profile, the anticipated problems and all those other things we expect of a formally written lesson plan? The only thing we can really tell from it is that the lesson had something to do with CV writing.

The lack of detail in this particular lesson is of course because the teacher in question didn’t write it for anyone else to read. As she explains, it was for her own personal use: “I treat lesson plans like shopping lists – I write them at home in preparation for the task ahead and then don’t look at them after that. The helpful part for me is writing it down, not sticking to it.”

I think her ‘shopping list’ approach to planning is probably true for most teachers at a day-to-day level. We don’t have time to write long detailed documents with every step described in detail and – especially if we’re experienced – we don’t need to. As she says above, the ‘writing it down’ is not an end in itself, it’s just part of a longer thought process.

Because most teachers tend to plan in this less formalised way, there is often debate about – and sometimes criticism of – the more formalised type of planning that is expected on teacher training courses or when teachers are formally observed and assessed. Teachers sometimes wonder if the long hours spent writing detailed documents which predict what they might (or might not) do at every stage is time well spent.

I’d argue that on training courses it can be time well spent – especially for new and inexperienced teachers – because it’s a way to develop your thought process. However, I’d question whether a formally prepared lesson plan always has to take the shape of a page with rows and columns that a teacher is expected to fill in and rigidly follow.

In my webinar on this topic, I’ll propose that we take some fresh perspectives on lesson planning by varying our approaches and thought processes at the planning stage. I’ll present some alternative ways to develop lesson planning skills and I’ll demonstrate how visual thinking can help to aid your planning. Participants will also be invited to give their own perspective(s) on lesson planning.

If you’d like to sign up to join John Hughes’ free webinar on the 19th or 22nd of January, please follow the link below. We hope to see you there!

register-for-webinar