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8 easy steps to using project-based learning in the classroom

Two robots holding handsStudents are always fascinated with the idea of time travel and understanding the relationship between the past and the future. I remember as a child both burying and discovering time capsules full of cultural treasures and personal stories.

We have used the theme of time relationships and time capsules in this lesson plan to encourage students to understand and communicate with the past and send students in the past information about their lives now.

This lesson plan is based on a PBL (Project-Based Learning) cycle and for its output students are encouraged to work towards some form of poster or digital document that tells students of the past about the things they feel are important in the present day.

Students can use these posters and documents to enter The Project Competition 2020.

We hope you enjoy working through this project with your students and that they enjoy thinking about life in the past and how our lives have changed.

 

Download the Lesson Plan

 


 

Nik Peachey is a freelance writer, blogger, teacher trainer and consultant specialising in digital publishing, online course development and the development of digital resources for teachers. He has been involved in English language teaching since 1992 and has worked all over the world as a teacher, trainer and project manager. In 2016 after winning his second British Council Award for Innovations (ELTon) he co-founded PeacheyPublications Ltd.

Nik Peachey was manager of the British Council’s TeachingEnglish website from 2003 to 2007, Global Head of Learning for Macmillan’s online English school EnglishUp from 2014 to 2016. From 2017 – 2018 he worked with Eton College on their EtonX program of soft skills courses and later in 2018 he worked with Kings College London Online developing content for their master’s level Financial Law courses. He has co-edited with Alan Maley two books on creativity – ‘Integrating Global Issues in the Creative English Language Classroom’ and ‘Creativity in the English Language Classroom’ and published ten more through his own company.


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Mobile Learning for Language Development | Nik Peachey

As a novice teacher in North Africa in the early 90s, I remember clearly dissecting English language newspapers and magazines and scouring the local shops for bootlegged English language audio cassettes to find interesting content to base activities on for my students.

I also remember carrying around a bag of audio cassettes which my students would use to record their learning diary entries on and which I would take home to listen to before recording my reply and taking them back for them the next lesson. I guess this is why I find it baffling when I hear about schools or classrooms where students are being asked to turn off or not bring their mobile phones and devices.

I understand that competing with the screen can be a challenge. The apps that students use on these devices have been designed by people who have researched just how to distract and grab people’s attention, but I feel that the best way to grab their attention back is to start training students how to use the devices in a ways that will enhance their learning both in and out of class. One of the first things that we could do as teachers is help students take control of their devices, by turning off notifications for example (at least during lessons). Removing screen notifications as well as noises and vibrations will help prevent unwanted distractions.

Next, we need to help them put their mobile device to good use.

We can use a backchannel to connect our students and enable us to share and exchange digital materials with students during the class. A backchannel could be a simple chatroom that all students can enter. We can paste hyperlinks to articles, videos, audios, activities and worksheets into this room and then students can instantly access the content without having to type in long URLs or search Google. I use http://backchannelchat.com/ for all of my classes. They have a browser version as well as a mobile app that students can download for free. The app has been adapted for educational use, and as a teacher, I can easily control the chatroom by moderating messages and pinning tasks to the top of the room.

At the end of a lesson, students can download notes from the backchannel and save any useful links, comments, new vocabulary or documents.

We can use apps like Mentimeter to make our lessons more interactive. This is just one of many classroom response apps that enables teachers to deliver quizzes, polls Q&A sessions and even brainstorming tasks to students’ devices during the lesson. It also gives instant feedback that teachers can display on the whiteboard. I’ve used Mentimeter to get students brainstorming vocabulary into an interactive word cloud. This is great as they can see the word cloud changing as they add their words. We can also use it to do comprehension and concept checking and know exactly how many of our students are getting the answers right.

We can also start building multimedia lessons that are rich in graphics and images and which link directly to web-based resources. https://www.genial.ly is just one of many tools that we can use to create visually engaging materials that students can access on their digital devices. This is an example of a lesson I built for a group of students to get them to plan a fictional trip to Cambridge. They have a range of resources that they need to explore and which help them to find images, locations on a map, weather information, and interesting places and events. As they explore these resources, they can use the information they gather to plan a three-day trip together. Using the QR code at the beginning of the lesson, they can scan the materials directly onto their mobile device and access all of the links and instructions directly.

These are just a few of the many ways students can use their devices in the classroom to enhance their learning. In my webinar, we looked at many more and also investigated some of the apps they can use outside the classroom too. To find out more you can watch the recorded session here:

Watch the recording


Nik Peachey has worked all over the world as a language teacher, teacher trainer, technology trainer, and educational technology consultant. He is an award-winning course designer, materials writer, and author